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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
deals. >> miss merkel conducts foreign policy holding a weapon in her hands. >> the government takes a different view. the defense minister argued that exports to saudi arabia could help stabilize the situation in the middle east. we spoke to a defense analyst. i asked him how likely it is that saudi arabia could use these german tanks to put down uprisings and crush dissent. >> the boxer tanks which are discussed today are an armored vehicle used for transport purposes, not so much for riot control. it is a german-dutch corp. project. it is used mainly for the transportation to protect against insurgents in afghanistan. it is not designed so much for riot control or to control insurgencies, but more to protect the forces of germany and other countries in the field. >> the opposition is accusing the government of flouting court -- german guidelines. is that fair to say? >> the current policy guidelines for arms export in germany go back to the red green government a couple years ago. the current government is more or less responsible for the current guidelines. there is room for impr
-western foreign policy doctrine that the muslim brothers have told me they have not abandoned. we should look at that deal as a short-term thing and not be comfortable with the fact that the brotherhood is effectively using this process to gain the upper hand. >> eliot: eric traeger, thank you for your time. ambassador ginsberg, stick around to contemplate why the status quo may be the safest bet in the conflict. that's ahead in "viewpoint." young turks is that we're honest. they know that i'm not bs'ing them with some hidden agenda, actually supporting one party or the other. when the democrats are wrong, they know that i'm going to be the first one to call them out. they can question whether i'm right, but i think that the audience gets that this guy, to the best of his ability, is trying to look out for us. >>you couldn't say it any more powerfully than that. >>it really is incredible. >> eliot: in a region that grows increasingly unpredictable by the day is peace still a prospect when both sides of the israeli-palestinian conflict are missing from the negotiating table. with me now onc
, for instance, one of president obama's closest advisers. she was his principal foreign policy adviser during his first campaign and helped shape his world view. they have a similar world view. all of this signifies susan rice would be influential when she goes to speak to diplomats around the world and world leaders and also in formulating foreign policy, which is very good for the state department. on the downside, you see what's happening with the benghazi affair. she's likely to have a bruising confirmation process. some republican senators said they might hold up her nomination. that could drag out a while. john kerry, on the other hand, would be easily confirmable. you see the senators are encouraging president obama to nominate him. senator kerry also has a lot of world stature, has relationships with many world leaders. he's seen as someone who could help build on those relationships to further foreign policy and also senator kerry also, as chairman of the foreign relations committee, very popular chairman, has a lot of diplomatic experience. president obama has used him you know out
of the old foreign policy guard, versus this new foreign policy guard and some led by jon kyl who is not an isolationist, if you will. there is some isolationist views there but it's an interesting divide sitting in the senate. >> it's not even a divide anymore. some aren't part of the caucus anymore. with this issue, part of it is to say that there's skepticism, overall skepticism of the u.n. among some of the republican party, which is probably an understatement. this digs deeper into that deep rooted skepticism of the body in general. >> all right. i want to move to fiscal cliff here. there's a mix of public opinion and public policy here. democrats feel as if they're winning the public opinion war but that isn't going to get them 218 votes. so at what point does winning the public opinion sort of become diminishing returns? >> well, i don't think it comes to diminishing returns. you see consistently that the exit polls show that people -- not just support president obama but support seeing the wealthy pay a little bit more on taxes, half of the electorate said that. everybody
to get a better foreign policy or they will get run out of this country. i have spoken. deal with it. >> remi, how would you defend the owl if it was in court? >> it would be some sort of sanity defense i am sure. i didn't know much about this policy, so i did some research after i read the story. and i will tell you what i learned. back in february of this year, ken salazar called this plan a, quote, science-based approach that restores the health of our lands and wildlife and supports jobs and revenue for local communities. although there has been some press saying this is going to dough stroy jobs for people -- destroy jobs for people, that might thought necessarily be entirely accurate. they will allow logging. they are not going to be getting rid of people. >> i had an opinion before you brought this to my attention because you did some reading. i will choose to ignore what you said because it will hurt what i had to say. bill isn't one human job more available than one owl life? >> i don't know about that. according to what remi said we will be creating jobs here too. >> she is
and unless we wake up and really make a drastic change in our foreign policy america will pay a heavy price down the road. melissa: yeah, dramatic conclusion. thank you so much for coming on. i hope you come back. >> thank you. have a great day. melissa: what's in a name? well apparently $35,000 and counting. one man raking it in for auctioning off his name for an entire year. he is here to explain his brilliant scheme. i love it! it is coming u next. at the end of the day it is all about mney and your name apparently [ male announcer ] this is the age of knowing what you're made of. why let erectile dysfunction get in your way? talk to your doctor about viagra. ask if your heart is healthy enough for sex. do not take viagra if you take nitrates for chest pain; it may cae an unsafe drop in blood pressure. side effects include headache, flushing, upset stomach, and abnormal vision. to avoid long-term injury, seek immediate medical help for an erection lasting more than four hours. stop taking viagra and call your doctor right away if you experience a sudden decrease or loss in vision or hea
simes, president of the center for the national interest, a foreign policy think tank. and steven heydemann, a senior adviser for middle east initiatives at the united states institute of peace. he's worked with the syrian opposition on the challenges ahead once the assad regime falls. steve, to you first. what do you understand the situation on the ground to be right now in syria? >> we have seen in the past month a significant shift in the momentum of events on the ground. we have seen the opposition increase the effectiveness of its tactics. it has acquired weapons that have permitted it to challenge the regime much more effectively across a broad range of fronts ranging from the south of syria to damascus to the north, and we're seeing this reflected in the regime's response to the opposition including some of the activities surrounding movement of chemical weapons. we don't know exactly what's at stake but part of the speculation is that they're putting themselves into a position in which they could create a defensive zone if it turns out to they're unable to defend damascus
at the foreign policies. where are we in economic transition. absolutely nowhere. so i think the japanese have learned after three years of lost time that they do need to move things forward. okay ldp not being the best, we all know that however, in saying that, they at least know how to implement the policies. >> what's the policy of any significant change of monetary after the election compared to what tell like to see happen? >> there will be much stronger imposed. ldp is already verbally putting this on. it's almost a race who can put more pressure to bank of japan in the sense that they can alleviate the market. of course from a westerner's point of view, i'm sure in a dangerous move that they were asserting far too much pressure to central banks. but that's exactly almost like a tool that's been used for many of the parties involved to get elected right now in japan. >> all right. thank you. good to see you. on the asian agenda tomorrow, third quarter growth figures. india, a check on the country's services industry. and on the political front, as well, parliament gets ready to vote on a
's hard to fault the president on foreign policy. we did what he ran on. >> caller: right. and the thing with iraq -- the strategy we had in iraq was basically -- people got mad because he didn't leave immediately and people got mad because he didn't stay there long enough. the strategy followed the doctrine of counter insurgency which is you stabilize the government -- you can't just leave. you have to build up a government, police and everything like that and once it is stable then the forces leave and dod contracts come in to advise. >> stephanie: all right. i got to run. but thank you for your service, and thank you for your call. >> caller: thank you. >> stephanie: right? >> right. >> stephanie: smartest boy in class already. >> we need more flint locks. >> stephanie: we don't have enough boats. >> we have no cavalry anymore at all. good heavens. >> it is entirely unacceptable to have a repeat performance of what the american people watched with horror in the summer of 2011. >> stephanie: it's true. it's like bad food repeating on you. when i read this i was li
occasional disagreements on the conduct of foreign policy but i think it's been very rare that we have seen differently our views of how the department of defense should undertake its responsibilities. i'd also like to, as the subcommittee chair of the personnel subcommittee, i'd like to express my appreciation to our staff for all the work that they have done on this bill and the others. gary lelee, john clark, bri fire and jennifer knowles. they have been always accessible, extremely professional. it's been a great privilege to work with them. and i'd like a special moment of privilege here to recognize gordon peterson, who has been my military assistant through my time in the united states senate. gordon peterson and i graduated from the naval academy in the same year. he was a very fine and respected athlete at the naval academy. he went on to become a helicopter pilot in combat in vietnam. he gave our country 30 years of distinguished service as a naval officer. later was the editor-in-chief of "seapower" magazine, was special assistant to the commandant of the coast guard, and has bee
article in foreign policy recently. has been was a china adviser to mitt romney. he now heads the university of chicago. but he basically wrote about the sort of two chinas or to the ages. he said there's sort of a doctor jekyll and mr. hide that's evolving to a doctor jekyll, which is the nicer of the two is the economic issue. the dr. height is the strategic asia, is the security agent. if you look at the economic asia there's heavy amounts of interdependence, everybody is investigating each other. $19 billion in regional trade which includes india. if you look at the security asia, national entity, orders dispute, historical grievances just are driving things apart and you're seeing real impact on these. in the has its own problems in the region across china region across china. region across chandigarh on the border dispute. if you look at this is something that you want to be deeply engaged in or do you look at this is basically something that you can ride along and freeload and let america and canada and japan handled? >> steve, your question -- >> i'm and freeload, by t
. that is the bipartisan tradition we need more of in washington, especially on foreign policy. as you prepare to leave the senate you love, i think i speak on behalf of everybody here and millions of people across the country when i say your legacy will endure in a safer and more secure world and a safer and more secure america. we pray this nation produces more leaders with your sense of decency and stability and integrity. we are grateful to you. thank you very much. [applause] i will point out it was the coup took me on my first foreign trip as a senator to russia, ukraine, and we were there to see the cooperative production program in action. the first thing i learned is when dick travels overseas, it is not a duncan. -- junkin. we did not stop and look at beautiful sights and lounge around. he wore out every 25-year-old staffoer. what you also learn is dick -- the more remote a place is, the more obscure the facility is, the bigger a rock star dick is. [laughter] they love him. i remember walking through one facility. i leaned in for a closer look. they said, do not touch that orange stuff. at an
around by reving red pe. theiderelatinghe retail sector trying to attract foreign retailers to open stores. media have dubbed the policy the big bang reform. people who own shops are less enthusiastic. >> reporter: massive rallies took place across india in september to protest against the planned reforms. many small shop owners are worried that deregulation threatens their businesses. about 40 million people work in india's rebuilt industries. for decades the sector was considered a sacred cow, except -- exempt from deregulation. most businesses are small and independent. they see a growing sense of crisis that they won't be able to compete with large foreign chains. the government hopes new investment will lead to improvement in india's old fashion distribution system. some indian businesses use trucks to transport goods. others still rely on horse drawn cars. poor roads mean perishable items go bad enroute. and the country doesn't have enough warehouses to stop food tting before it gets to the store. the cost of spoiled produce adds to the prices for consumers. to improve the sit
. like, you can't do it all. we had an atlantic cover story weaselly that wasn't about foreign policy. the title was why women still can't have it all. but it does -- can america still have it all? and in the way, has framed that, the answer is no, that there are limits. >> steve, even as we rebalanced to the asia-pacific we have continued are deep engagement with the region, other countries just as if, there's one example in our defense strategic guidance put out in january talked about having to become a net provider of security. i think you see that over the last couple of decades, and you see ongoing today. we will continue to be engaged in a obvious of the middle east and north africa and globally. the united states is a global power. it is not a zero-sum game, particularly when you look at the importance of alliances and partnerships, both within the asia-pacific and globally. our objective is to continue to strengthen those alliances and partnerships, and if we, if i can pivot to the topic of china, to build on the areas of cooperation that we have across the border, including
their digital director. dan who was their foreign policy advisor, beth meyers. >> bill: you have all of the major players there. what did you learn from the romney campaign? >> just so many nuggets came out of it. when we talked about what happened with clint eastwood, stuart says personally, die think it was a big deal. he goes up to clint eastwood beforehand saying you're going to be talking about the same little speech you gave at two fund-raisers, aren't you? and eastwood -- he looked at him and just said yep and then he goes out and does the empty chair thing. but while that dominated the news of the night and it was part of the their at this of that convention, they didn't think it was determinative. >> bill: they're still in denial. >> the other thing that was interesting is on the selection of paul ryan. so the democrats this we kind of knew. actually, i know from another forum that david axelrod was at the university of chicago institute of politics. he talked about how he thought all along it would be eit
of its name will have a tough time getting to third. >> emily cadei is a foreign-policy writer for cq, congressional quarterly. you can read her work at rollcall.com and follow her on twitter@emily cadei. thanks. >> guest: absolutely. >> for the first time, bradley melling's attorney spoke out publicly on his client. manning is accused of leaking classified documents on wikileaks. manny's pretrial hearing is underway. this is a half-hour. [cheers and applause] >> thank you. thank you. well, i really appreciate the turnout here and especially the turnout by the press. thank you for that. [applause] as many of you know, i have not participated any public events before today. i also avoid any interviews with the media. it was and still is my belief that bradley manning deserves an attorney that is focused on what is happening in the courtroom and only what is happening in the courtroom. that is why i have chosen not to do the interviews. but today however marks a milestone and is actually supposed to be really to the motions hearing that we were going through and it would mark the end of
. here to talk about impact of all of it, we have the vice president of foreign and defense policy studies wiih the american enterprise institute. welcome back to the show. thank you for joining us. >> thank you. melissa: let me get your reaction what is going on today. first in egypt. reports he left the palace. is that meaningful to you? >> i don't think so. you know, i think it is probably just discretion on his part. they're firing. there is a lot of violence there. people are climbing over the fences. i suspect rather than fleeing the palace as it has been made to sound in certain headlines he is just actually getting out of the way of this confrontation. melissa: it sounds pretty serious. one of the points you make from one perspective shows democracy is in action. before the protests began a lot of people made prediction we would see many protesters out there in support of morsi. to them and what else to go out and protest. seems like there are a lot more angry protesters out there than those in favor of president morsi. looks like he is losing at least some control. what ha
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)